Facile And Efficient Strategy For Removal Of Reactive Industrial Dye By Using Tea Waste

Arif Reza1, 2, Faheem A Sheikh3*, Hern kim4, Mohammad Afzal Zargar5, M. Zainal Abedin2

1Environmental Ecology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science, Kangwon National University, 1 Kangwondaehak-gil, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-do,24341, South Korea

2School of Environmental Science and Management, Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB), Dhaka 1229, Bangladesh

3Department of Nanotechnology, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

4Department of Energy Science and Technology, Smart Living innovation Technology Center, Myongji University, Yongin,  Gyeonggido, 17058, Republic of Korea

5Department of Biochemistry, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Adv. Mater. Lett., 2016, 7 (11), pp 878-885

DOI: 10.5185/amlett.2016.6363

Publication Date (Web): Oct 01, 2016

E-mail:faheemnt@uok.edu.in

Abstract


The present study deals with the study tea waste as an effective functional adsorbent for the removal of reactive blue 21(RB21) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were influenced by several parameters such as contact time, solution pH and mass of adsorbent and initial dye concentration. The results indicated that the maximum removal of RB21 dye by tea waste was after 90 minutes of contact time and at the nearly neutral pH of 6.0. Moreover, two isotherm models, namely Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium of RB21 dye onto tea waste. The data obtained was in good agreement with Langmuir model than that of Freundlich model, showing a monolayer adsorption capacity of 28.99 mg/g. Furthermore, it was observed that tea waste did not require any supplementary pre-treatments; such as activation before the application. Collectively, this work highlights the promise of pristine TW, ability to harness it for adsorption of dyes, while also prioritizing areas for future research and development (e.g., collection of TW from local vendors and resulting in environmental friendly disposal of the same). The presented strategy exhibited excellent adsorption capacity of TW for the removal of RB21 from the aqueous solutions. Nonetheless, in most parts of the globe TW from local vendors is available without any cost, regeneration is not required and the saturated adsorbent can be disposed by incineration.

Keywords

Tea waste, adsorbent, isotherm models.

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