Digital Light Processing (DLP) 3D Printing of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Biopolymer, Commercially available Ultra-High and Tough (UHT) Resin and Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) Nanoparticles Mixture for Tissue Engineering Scaffold Application

Nor Hasrul Akhmal Ngadiman1, Muhammad Aniq Barid Basri1, Noordin Mohd Yusof1,*, Ani Idris2, Ehsan Fallahiarezoudar3

1School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Johor, 81310 Malaysia

2School of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, C/o Institute of Bioproduct Development, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Johor, 81310 Malaysia

3Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, East of Guilan, University of Guilan, Guilan, Roudsar, 4199613776 Iran

Adv. Mater. Lett., 2019, 10 (11), pp 802-806

DOI: 10.5185/amlett.2019.0023

Publication Date (Web): Oct 04, 2019

E-mail: noordin@mail.fkm.utm.my

Abstract


Digital Light Processing (DLP) 3D printing process has been used with standard, commercially available ultra-high and tough (UHT) photopolymer resin to produce for various 3D parts. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) biopolymer has been used extensively in biomedicine due to its excellent performance in biocompatibility and hydrophilicity. However, it offers low mechanical strength. The inclusion of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been found to be able to increase the mechanical properties of TE scaffolds fabricated using a combination of processes. This study aims at exploring the possibility of using various mixtures which consists of different combinations UHT resin, PEG solution and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with the DLP 3D printer system. The effects of various quantities of mixtures were investigated in terms of their mechanical and biocompatibility properties with a view of producing TE scaffolds. The results from this study proves that the simpler, DLP 3D printer system can be used with a mixture of standard photopolymer and biopolymer resins, and nanoparticles.  The addition of PEG and γ-Fe2O3 enhanced the mechanical and biocompatibility properties of the developed structure. © VBRI Press.

Keywords

Tissue engineering scaffold, biomaterials, nanoparticle, 3D printer.

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