Cover Page August-2019-Advanced Materials Letters

Advanced Materials Letters

Volume 10, Issue 8, Pages 604-609, August 2019
About Cover

3D printing as the state-of-the-art emerging technology offers a platform for the new industrial horizons. The manufacturing process for creating 3D physical objects done via successive layer-by-layer deposition of materials such as metal, plastic, ceramics, or even living cells. The 3D printing concept was first proposed in the 1980s using stereolithography to make polymer objects. 3D technology could transform manufacturing, global product consumption and supply chains. The cover photo of July 2019 issue describes the structure of a 3D printed objects and to celebrate the 39th anniversary of its innovation.


Investigating the possibility of using acetic acid in place of HF in chromium-benzenedicarboxylates (MIL-53 and MIL-101) synthesis applicable for CO2 adsorption

Fariba Soltanolkottabi1, Mohammad Reza Talaie1,2,*, Seyedfoad Aghamiri1, Shahram Tangestaninejad

1Chemical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Hezarjerib, Isfahan, P.O. Box 81746-73441, Iran

2Chemical Engineering Department, College of Petroleum & Gas, University of  Shiraz, Molasadra, Shiraz, P.O. Box 71348-51154, Iran

3Department of Chemistry, Catalysis Division, University of Isfahan, Hezarjerib, Isfahan, P.O. Box 81746-73441, Iran 

Adv. Mater. Lett., 2019, 10 (8), pp 604-609

DOI: 10.5185/amlett.2019.2280

Publication Date (Web): Jan 14, 2019

E-mail: mrtalaiekh@yahoo.com  

Abstract

The present study concerns chromium benzenedicarboxylates MIL-53 and MIL-101 hydrothermal syntheses utilizing acetic acid, and their capabilities for CO2 adsorption. The effect of the parameters such as reaction time, reaction temperature, water concentration, and acetic acid content on adsorption characteristics of these metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is investigated using L8 Taguchi experimental design. In synthesized MIL-101, with adding 1 acetic acid equivalent with respect to Cr, reaction time and temperature have been reduced from 24 h and 483 K to 6 h and 463 K. Also, the CO2 adsorption capacity has been measured by a volumetric method. The results have revealed that adding acetic acid and reducing water in the reaction mixture results in converting MIL-101 to MIL-53 which tends to an increase in CO2 adsorption. With regard to reaction conditions, the results show that MIL-53 and MIL-101 have the maximum CO2 adsorption capacities of 17.5 and 11.0 mmolg-1 at 3.5 bar and 299.2 K, respectively.  © VBRI Press.

Keywords

MIL-53, MIL-101, acetic acid, CO2 adsorption.

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